• Working Hours - Mon - Thu: 8:00 - 17:00; Fri: 8:00 - 14:00
What are you looking for?

ONGOING PROJECTS

ONGOING PROJECTS

AFRICAN FEMALE BREAST CANCER EPIDEMIOLOGY

(LABORATORY SAFETY SCIENCE AND INNOVATION PROJECT)

We are a member of the PhArmacoVigilance Africa (PAVIA) consortium aimed at strengthening pharmacovigilance in four African countries namely Ethiopia, Nigeria, Swaziland and Tanzania. The consortium is funded by the European Developing Countries Clinical Trial Images Partnership (EDCTP).

To improve pharmacovigilance, the project is strengthening routine reporting of drug adverse events amongst other activities. We will also be carrying out research, training health care workers across the country on pharmacovigilance, and developing necessary guidelines.

The D2EFT study is a phase IIIB/IV randomised open-label trial to compare dolutegravir with pharmaco-enhanced darunavir versus dolutegravir with predetermined nucleosides versus recommended standard of care antiretroviral regimens in patients with HIV-1 infection who have failed recommended first line therapy.

The major aim of this study is to find the best 2nd line regimen, among the current range of drugs used in our environment that would have maximal benefit for most patients who have failed first line HIV 1 drugs.

This is without the infrastructure of drug sensitivity testing in a resource constrained environment. Its emphasis is finding a regimen that will fulfil criteria including:

  • Efficacy at significantly reducing viral load
  • Encouraging adherence due to a lower incidence of drug toxicity, drug to drug interactions or other adverse events,
  • Improving participant quality of life

The D2EFT study is designed to support HIV treatment in the sub-Saharan African context and will provide knowledge to significantly improve treatment outcomes and change the current strategy for managing patients who have failed 1st line HIV treatment.

This study is a cluster randomized trial of innovative interventions targeting challenges of adolescents in transitioning from the pediatric treatment to the adult treatment program. Specific aims are to,

  • Inform strategies for transitioning services in resource-limited settings
  • Examine developmental, clinical and other factors for successful transition
  • Gain insight on implementation barriers among African adolescents to inform targets for structured intervention.

ADAPT Study is an NIH R01 five-year study (2016-2021) conducted in central and Northern Nigeria at selected health facilities that we support with funding from US President’s Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR) through CDC.

AFRICAN COLLABORATIVE CENTER FOR MICROBIOME AND GENOMICS

THE ADOLESCENT TO ADULT PATIENT CENTERED HIV TRANSITION STUDY

(NIGERIAN POPULATION-BASED HIV IMPACT ASSESSMENT)

The BEAMING Study is researching into how breast milk affects infant’s gut bacteria and how this in turn affects infant’s growth and their ability to respond to childhood vaccination. This effect will be studied in HIV exposed uninfected children and the results compared with HIV uninfected unexposed children.

It is an NIH funded study that will utilize stored samples from HIV-Exposed Infants in a previous study, the Infant Study.

This study seeks to evaluate the prevalence of malaria parasitemia among blood donors donating blood to children 0-10 years in Abuja, Nigeria. It is funded by the International Society for Blood Transfusion.

This study conducts rigorous research into breast cancer and its molecular subtypes in indigenous population of Nigeria, in order to understand the epidemiological and genomic determinants of the incidence of breast cancer, its molecular subtypes, and the role of diet in etiology of breast cancer in Nigeria.

The TRACING study is a prospective cohort study that is made up of two components. The first component seeks to train health care workers on tuberculosis infection control practices, assess the level of infection control, and measure the output of these trainings. The second component of the study seeks to measure the risk of tuberculosis infections among health care workers.

Aim of the study is to provide evidence to strengthen TB infection control mechanism, and develop policies relevant for protecting health workers.

It is being implemented in at least 14 health facilities across the Federal Capital Territory and Nasarawa States. Facilities were selected based on the availability of HIV and TB services, and the number of patients accessing care in these facilities.